Roost Smart Smoke Alarm products
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120V HARDWIRED WITH ROOST SMART BATTERY BACKUP

IT'S THE SMART SMOKE ALARM THAT UPGRADES YOUR LIFE

What is a smart smoke alarm? A smart smoke alarm is an alarm with advanced features that enhance the safety of your home, enabled by a Wi-Fi connection. Below, there are 2 smart smoke alarm options. Certified for use only in the United States.

$79.99

Model: RSA-400
  • 4-in-1: For smoke, fire, carbon monoxide and natural gas detection
  • 120V hardwired plus Roost Smart Battery backup
  • FREE shipping with Orders over $30!
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$59.99

Model: RSA-200
  • 2-in-1: For smoke and
    fire detection
  • 120V hardwired plus Roost Smart Battery backup
  • FREE shipping with Orders over $30!

Buy Now!

The Roost Smart Smoke Alarm

The Roost Smart Smoke Alarm series combines the safety and robustness of best-in-class detection technology with the convenience and peace of mind of the Roost Smart Battery. Each "120V hard-wired” Roost Smart Smoke Alarm has an integrated Roost Smart Battery to enable notifications of alerts.

connected

Connects to Wi-Fi for smarter features

better detection

Faster detection for slow smoldering and flaming fires

accurate

Fewer false and
nuisance alarms

roost smart smoke alarm

no 3 AM Chirps

Notifies you when alarm batteries run low.

alerts when you are away

Notifies your phone if your alarm sounds.

Inform your inner circle

Notifies your friends and family in an emergency

The Roost App

Monitoring. Notifying. Sharing.
Roost has more than your ceilings covered.

Easy Set-Up

Battery installation < 5 mins

Alerts when you need 'em

App tells you when your alarm at home sounds

Low battery alerts

Get notifications about a low battery on your phone

roost app screens

Set up your monitors

Your friends and family can monitor your alarm in an emergency

See activity history

See the last time each alarm sounded or was tested

Free roost app

Available to download for iOS and Android

 

Good for your ceiling.
even better for your home.

  • 1
    Install your Roost Smart Smoke Alarm as you normally would on the ceiling or wall.
  • 2
    Set up your Roost Smart Battery using Wi-Fi connection, the Roost app and your smartphone.
  • 3
    Place your Roost Smart Battery in your smart smoke alarm.
  • 4
    Test your alarm, and you’re done!

Down to the nitty-gritty

All of the details about the Roost Smart Smoke Alarm

Warranty

10 years for the smart smoke alarm, 1 year for the smart battery

Replacement Battery

Available for purchase separately here.

Tech Requirements

Requires Wi-Fi, installation of free Roost app on iOS 8 (or higher) or Android 4.2 (or higher) devices, and 120V electrical connection.

Dimensions

For both the RSA-200 and 400, the product dimensions are: 5.63” (H) x 5.63” (W) x 1.75” (L)

Compliance

Getting Started

Already purchased your Roost Smart Smoke Alarm? Click here to get started.

Helpful Home Safety Tips

  • The RSA-400 and RSA-200 use Universal Smoke Sensing Technology™ (USST) with microprocessor intelligence to detect fast flaming fires and also respond very quickly to slow smoldering fires – up to 87 percent faster* than the maximum allowable alarm limit
  • A recent study from the University of Maryland’s School of Fire Protection Engineering tested the nuisance alarm resistance of this technology. The study results confirmed these alarms are more resistant to nuisance alarms. Based on the results of this test series, alarms using this technology are observed to have nominally equivalent nuisance alarm immunity to photoelectric smoke alarms in kitchen scenarios, and are more resistant to nuisance sources near bathrooms than photoelectric smoke alarms. They are more resistant to nuisance alarms than all other smoke alarms utilizing an ionization sensor.
  • Our alarms virtually eliminate nuisance alarms from sources like every day cooking smoke and steamy showers.

University of Maryland Study:
Smoke Alarm Nuisance Occurances

  • Replace your smoke alarms every 10 years. Smoke alarms wear out over time. Although well-maintained alarms typically last about ten years, if you don’t know when your alarms were installed, or if they are approaching 10 years, replace them now.
  • Proper placement is important. Install a smoke alarm on each level of your home and inside each bedroom.
  • Test your smoke alarms: Test them monthly by pressing the test button on each alarm.
  • Early warning provides additional time to escape a fire. Consider using dual sensor smoke alarms which contain both ionization and photoelectric technology in one alarm.
  • Become familiar with the features of your smoke alarms. Read the user’s manual and follow the installation, testing and maintenance instructions.
  • Interconnection: Interconnected alarms can provide earlier warning than stand-alone alarms, especially if there is a fire in a remote area of the dwelling. Smoke alarms wired-in to your home with battery backup should be considered. When one smoke alarm sounds, the others also alarm, alerting you to an alarm in another area of your home. CO alarms can also be interconnected to smoke alarms. In a multiple station arrangement, a maximum of 24 devices may be interconnected.
  • Make an escape plan. Be sure everyone in the home, especially children, knows the shortest exit from every floor.
  • Do not remove batteries. Smoke alarm batteries should not be used in other appliances such as personal stereos or games.
  • Nuisance alarms: If cooking smoke sets off your smoke alarm, do not disable it. Press the silence button (if available), wave a towel or newspaper, open a window, or turn on an exhaust fan to clear the alarm.
  • Maintenance: Keep smoke alarms clean. Dust and debris can interfere with operation. Vacuum the cover and the area around your smoke alarm regularly.

  • Ever burnt the toast and set off the fire alarm? What about setting off the alarm with a steamy shower? False alarms or “nuisance alarms” happen when your smoke alarm sounds when no hazard is present.
  • Your first reaction may be to take the battery out to silence the noisy alarm. But according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), nuisance alarms, or “false” alarms, are the leading cause for intentionally disabled smoke alarms in America. Roughly two-thirds of home fire deaths happen in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Instead, choose an alarm, like the Roost Smart Smoke Alarm, with technology that better distinguishes nuisance alarms to safely prevent these types of alarms.
  • Or upgrade your existing smoke alarm with the Roost Smart Battery. If your alarm is powered by battery-only, you can snooze the alarm sound with your smartphone.
  • Did you know?
    1. In 2009, U.S. fire departments responded to 16 false alarms for every 10 actual fires.
    2. The U.S. fire department responds to 2.17 million false alarms each year.
  • 73% of false alarms are triggered by cooking.

  • Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, and poisonous gas that results from the incomplete combustion of fuels, such as natural or liquefied petroleum (“LP”) gas, gasoline, oil, wood, coal, and other fuels.
  • According to the CDC, more than 400 in the United States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning.
  • Eighty-two percent of the CO deaths in 2012 occurred in a home location.
  • More CO fatalities occurred in the cold months of the year. In 2012, 53 percent occurred during the four cold months of November, December, January, and February.

  • Replace your carbon monoxide alarms every 10 years. Carbon monoxide alarms wear out over time. Although well-maintained alarms typically last about seven years, if you don’t know when your alarms were installed, or if they are approaching 10 years, replace them now.
  • Proper placement is important. Install a carbon monoxide alarm on each level of your home and inside each bedroom.
  • Test your carbon monoxide alarms monthly: test them by pressing the test button on each alarm.
  • Early warning provides additional time to escape. Consider using dual sensor carbon monoxide alarms which contain both ionization and photoelectric technology in one alarm.
  • Interconnection: Interconnected alarms can provide earlier warning of than stand-alone alarms, especially if there is an alarm in a remote area of the dwelling. Carbon monoxide alarms wired-in to your home with battery backup should be considered. CO alarms can also be interconnected to smoke alarms. When one alarm sounds, the others also alarm, alerting you to fire or CO in another area of your home.
  • Make an escape plan. Be sure everyone in the home, especially children, know the shortest exit from every floor. Do not remove batteries. Carbon monoxide alarm batteries should not be used in other appliances such as personal stereos or games.
  • Nuisance alarms: If cooking smoke sets off your carbon monoxide alarm, do not disable it. Press the silence button (if available), wave a towel or newspaper, open a window, or turn on an exhaust fan to clear the alarm.

  • If you smell gas (a rotten egg smell), immediately evacuate the building and call your gas utility agency or the fire department.
  • If you smell gas,
    • DO NOT use light switches
    • DO NOT try to find the source of the leak
    • DO NOT smoke or strike matches
    • DO NOT use a telephone or any electrical equipment that might create a spark
    • DO NOT let small children play with or near natural gas appliances or pipes, even the knobs on the oven or cooktop.
    • DO NOT use a space heater UNTIL you are sure it has been vented properly. If using a vent-free heater, make sure the automatic cut-off switch is operational.
  • Have at least one working carbon monoxide detector for each level of your home.
  • Gas appliances should have a clear, steady blue flame. Small occasional amounts of yellow and orange are normal. The only exception is a natural gas fireplace designed to have yellow flames.
  • Never cover the temperature controls, air openings or vents of an appliance.
  • Keep range and oven burners clean. Never line the oven completely with foil.
  • Never try to repair or install a gas appliance yourself. Never let a home handy-person try to do the job for you.
  • Turn off gas fireplaces and space heaters before going to bed or leaving home. They're not intended as a main source of heat.
  • Gas appliance connectors (the flexible, corrugated metal tubing) should be checked by a qualified appliance service contractor periodically.
  • Never attach electrical grounding wires to gas piping.
  • Keep the space around furnaces and water heaters clean and clear of build-up, rags, newspapers, and other debris.
  • Never store combustibles such as gasoline, aerosol cans, paint, solvents, household cleaners, pool chemicals, or similar products near any fuel-burning equipment.